General Dermatology

Our expert team is highly skilled in treating a wide range of conditions, helping our patients achieve healthy skin and regain confidence. We have extensive experience caring for acne, various forms of skin cancer, rosacea, moles (nevi), psoriasis, rashes, warts, and more.

Acne

One of the most common skin conditions in the United States, acne involves pimples occurring on the face, chest, and back. The condition comprises two kinds of blemishes. The first, whiteheads and blackheads are non-inflammatory, and are unlikely to result in scarring if they don’t get infected. The second, red pustules or papules, are inflamed pores that collect pus and can result in scarring.

Causes of Acne

Under normal conditions, glands under the skin secrete an oily substance called sebum that moves along each hair follicle then onto the skin’s surface, taking old skin cells with it. When acne occurs, the sebum and old cells get trapped below the skin, producing whiteheads or blackheads. If these blemishes become irritated, they may turn into red pustules or papules. Scratching or picking at these lesions can lead to scarring.

Treatments for Acne

The process of treating acne requires patience because there is no overnight fix for the condition. Some therapy options include:

  • Benzoyl Peroxide: Used in mild cases to lessen blockages in the hair follicles
  • Topical and Oral Antibiotics: Used to treat infection that may occur in the pores
  • Hormone Treatments: Used for adult women with acne caused by hormones
  • Tretinoin: A derivative of Vitamin A that helps unplug the blocked material in whiteheads and blackheads
  • Extraction: Uses a small metal instrument to remove whiteheads and blackheads
  • Light Treatments
  • Chemical Peels

Skin Cancer

A common type of cancer in the United States, skin cancer is generally curable when caught early. People who have had skin cancer, however, are at a higher risk of developing a new skin cancer in the future, making regular self-examination and visits to your dermatologist a vital part of your health.

The majority of skin cancer cases are composed of the three following cancer types:

Basal Cell Carcinoma

The most common type of skin cancer, basal cells are found in the deepest layer of the epidermis. Overexposure to UVB radiation damages the body’s natural repair system, causing basal cell carcinomas to form. These are generally slow-growing tumors that rarely spread. Most basal cell carcinomas occur on the face and neck because these areas get the most sun.

Basal cell carcinomas can appear in various ways:

  • A raised pink or pearly bump with a pearly edge, and tiny, visible blood vessels
  • Pigmented bumps that resemble moles with a pearly edge
  • A sore that repeatedly heals then re-opens
  • A flat, scaly scar that appears waxy with blurred edges

Regardless of the appearance, these lesions all tend to bleed with little or no cause.

There are many risk factors for basal cell carcinoma, which include sun exposure, ultraviolet radiation exposure (tanning beds), fair skin, advanced age (most skin cancers occur in people over 50), and therapeutic radiation used to treat other health conditions.

A diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma requires a biopsy that involves removing either all or part of the tumor. 

There are many treatments for basal cell carcinoma, including the following therapies:

  • Cryosurgery: Using liquid nitrogen to freeze off the tumor
  • Curettage and Desiccation: Using a small metal instrument to scrape out the tumor, and applying an electric current to the tissue to destroy any remaining cancer cells
  • Mohs Micrographic Surgery: Combining the removal of cancerous tissue with microscopic review. Used for large tumors, this method allows surgeons to save more healthy skin when removing the tumor.
  • Radiation Therapy: Used for tumors that are difficult to treat because of their location, severity, or persistence
  • Surgical Excision: Surgically removing the tumor
  • Prescription Creams: For application at home over a course of weeks to stimulate the body’s natural immune system

Squamous Cell Carcinoma

Found in the upper layer of the epidermis, squamous cells appear as crusted or scaly patches of skin with an inflamed base and are usually tender to the touch.

Most frequently appearing on the scalp, face, ears, and back of hands, squamous cell carcinoma can develop anywhere, such as inside the mouth and on the genitalia. The condition tends to occur in fair-skinned, middle-aged, and elderly people with a history of exposure to the sun. Squamous cell carcinoma sometimes evolves from actinic keratoses, which are precancerous, scaly lesions that can be flesh-colored, yellow-black, or reddish-brown, and appear on rough or leathery skin.

Like basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma is diagnosed using a biopsy that removes either all or part of the tumor.

There are many treatments for squamous cell carcinoma, including the following:

  • Cryosurgery: Using liquid nitrogen to freeze off the tumor
  • Curettage and Desiccation: Using a small metal instrument to scrape out the tumor, and applying an electric current to the tissue to destroy any remaining cancer cells
  • Mohs Micrographic Surgery: Combining the removal of cancerous tissue with microscopic review. Used for large tumors, this method allows surgeons to save more healthy skin when removing the tumor.
  • Radiation Therapy: Used for tumors that are difficult to treat because of their location, severity, or persistence
  • Surgical Excision: Surgically removing the tumor
  • Prescription Creams: For application at home over a course of weeks to stimulate the body’s natural immune system

Melanoma

Although melanoma is the least common form of skin cancer, it is the most aggressive. Melanoma is also the most common type of cancer found among adults between 25–29 years of age.

Melanocytes are cells in the bottom layer of the epidermis that produce melanin, the substance involved in skin pigmentation. This is why melanomas frequently appear as dark brown or black spots. They can look like moles and often form inside existing moles. While the majority of melanomas are caused by overexposure to the sun beginning in childhood, they can also be hereditary.

Melanomas are dangerous because they spread quickly to internal organs and the lymph system. Early detection is essential to curing this type of skin cancer. It is crucial for people to conduct regular self-examinations in order to catch potential skin cancers early, when they are most treatable.

Melanoma is diagnosed using a biopsy. There are many treatments for melanoma, including radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and surgical removal.

How to Look for Melanoma

Be on the lookout for the following changes in your skin that may be warning signs for melanoma:

  • Big, brown spots with dark speckles that develop anywhere on the body
  • Dark lesions occurring on the soles of the feet, palms of the hands, toes, fingertips, nose, mouth, or genitalia
  • Growths that appear translucent pearly and dome-shaped
  • Pre-existing moles that start to itch, grow, or bleed
  • Black or brown streaks beneath the nails
  • Sores that keep healing then re-opening
  • Slow-growing, scaly patches that appear red or pink

Review the American Academy of Dermatology’s “ABCDE” guide for determining whether a mole or lesion may turn into cancer:

  • Asymmetry: One half does not match the other half
  • Border: It has edges that are irregular, scalloped, or poorly defined
  • Color: It has different colors throughout
  • Diameter: It is more than 6 millimeters when diagnosed (but it can also be smaller)
  • Evolving: It is different from other lesions, or it changes in size, shape, or color

If you notice any of these warning signs, make a dermatology appointment immediately to determine if the mole or lesion is cancerous.

Preventing Skin Cancer

Approximately 90 percent of non-melanoma cancers result from exposure to the sun’s ultraviolet radiation. Preventing skin cancer therefore involves adopting these sun safety practices:

  • Avoid the sun during peak times (10 am to 4 pm).
  • Cover arms and legs with protective clothes.
  • Wear sunglasses and a wide-brimmed hat.
  • Use sunscreens all year long with an SPF of 30 or greater, and sunblocks that protect against UVA and UVB rays. Choose products labeled “broad spectrum.”
  • Check your skin each month and call your dermatologist if you see changes.
  • Get regular skin checks. Adults should be examined annually by a dermatologist.
Dr. Krishtul with assistant

Practice Information

Mount Sinai Doctors New York Dermatology
3801 PGA Boulevard, Suite 107
Palm Beach Gardens
FL 33410
Phone: 561-594-0050
Fax: 888-677-3527

Practice Hours
Monday: 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Tuesday: 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Thursday: 9:00 AM – 6:00 PM
Friday: 1:00 PM – 5:00 PM

Mount Sinai Doctors New York in Palm Beach
625 N. Flagler Drive, Mezzanine Level
West Palm Beach, FL 33401
Phone: 561-268-2000
Fax: 561-328-9752

Practice Hours
Monday: 1:00 PM – 5:00 PM
Friday: 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM

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